Honda Crosstour Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
***As with any maintenance, this is not THE way, but A way to do the following. Read all of the following and ensure you can do so safely and have the proper tools, parts and materials to do so without damage to the car or injury/death to yourself or others.***

Regular automotive fluid changes are the single easiest and most effective measure to ensure proper, efficient and long lasting engine, transmission, power-steering and brake life. With that being said, regular engine oil and engine oil filter service will undoubtedly extend the life of your engine. Those who have built/rebuilt Japanese engines can tell you tolerances are tight (really really tight) and the engine oil does much more than just lubricate the cam, lobes, crank and cylinders.

While the Honda Maintenance Minder (MM) is a reliable and proven system, it is my opinion that there is some deserved speculation to the idea that a large part of the MM is bent on reducing the reported owner's maintenance costs; this in an effort for Honda to further identify themselves as a low maintenance cost manufacturer. Again, it's just my opinion.

Oil and Oil Filter Change

As with anything else, if you don't know what you are doing, then don't.
*Otherwise, drive the car for a couple of miles or let it run until the cooling fan has cycled twice.

*Engine oil flows much better when it's hot.

*Park the car on a hard, flat & level (yes, there is a difference) surface like a concrete garage. Ensure the area is well lit and well ventilated. Also ensure the area you will be performing the oil change, any service for that matter, is clear, free of children and safe from anything you can trip over. That means don't be lazy and leave the floor-jack or that open jug of new oil between the car and your work bench. Murphy will make you trip over or slip on it.

*Before shutting the engine off, turn the steering wheel to the right until it stops. This isn't necessary, but will make life a tad bit easier.

*Set the parking brake with about 45lbs of pulling force.

*Chalk both of the rear tires. If you don't have these, then stop until you have them.

*Open the hood and remove and clean the Engine Oil Filler Cap and the Engine Oil Dipstick. Set them to the side.

*Clean the top and the area around the Engine Oil Filler Cap.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After ensuring the safety of your work area and you have verified you have the proper oil, oil filter, crush washer and tools for the job, you are ready to raise the car.

*Locate the front center jack point. Position a floor-jack with a cupped style lift (not the piston style, these are famous for slipping out from under the car and destroying your radiator) and raise the car. Once it is up, lower it on to jack stands using the forward side rail jack points. If you don't have jack stands or don't know where these points are, stop and visit Jiffy Lube.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
***Warning... The Engine Oil will be scalding hot and the area you will be working next to is the exhaust. Take precautions.***

*Using a 17mm socket and ratchet or a 17mm wrench, loosen the Engine Oil Drain Plug. Once it is loose, it should spin freely. If you haven't already done so, place an empty catch container with the capacity of at least 6 qts.

*Continue to spin the plug loose until it drops into the container. The plug will be very hot... Just let it fall.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
***Warning... Oil will drain once the seal of the Engine Oil Filter has been broken.***

It you want to use a Engine Oil Filter socket, the Honda filter and the Mobil-1 M1-110 both use a 65mm 14 flute socket.

*Position the catch container so that the oil will continue to drain or drip in from the Engine Oil Drain Plug hole, while also being in position under the filter.

*Using whatever Engine Oil Filter loosening tool you have chosen, loosen the Engine Oil Filter. Oil will drain once the seal is broken.

*Like the drain plug, the filter should spin freely once the seal is free from then seal face. Again, be careful. The oil will be hot.

*Continue to support the bottom of the filter as it spins; do not let it fall, cause it'll be messy.

*Once free from the threads, remove the filter and discard.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
*Make sure the rubber gasket from the old Engine Oil Filter did not stick to the seal face.

*Prep the new Engine Oil Filter by pouring a little of the new Engine Oil into the new Engine Oil Filter; just a little though, maybe 1/3.

*Lightly coat the rubber gasket on the Engine Oil Filter with the new Engine Oil.

*Wipe away any remaining Engine Oil from the Engine Oil Filter seal face and hand-thread the Engine Oil Filter until the seal seats.

*Torque the new Engine Oil Filter to 9lbf.ft or, basically, moderately hand tight.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
*Locate the Engine Oil Drain Plug and remove the crush washer. If the crush washer isn't still on the plug, find it. Do not replace the plug until you have located the old crush washer. It is either in the catch container, rolling around your work area somewhere or it is still attached to the oil pan on the car. Either way, find it and discard it. They can be reused, but ALWAYS try to use a new one.

*While both sides of the crush washer are relatively flat, close inspection will reveal one side is definitely more flat than the other. The flatter side will face the oil pan. The not-so-flatter side will face the drain plug face.

*Wipe away any excess oil from the Engine Oil Drain Plug hole and hand thread the plug until is seats. Wipe again and then torque plug to 29lbf.ft. Do not over tighten. While the plug is made to strip before the pan does, this never seems to end up being the case.

*Once done, re-wipe any residual oil from the bottom of the car and begin removing your tools from the work area underneath the car.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
*Take a second and think back. Ensure you properly torqued the Engine Oil Filter and the Engine Oil Filter Drain Plug. You used a new crush washer, right? Also ensure you have removed ALL of your tools, lights, towels and so on and you cleaned your work area.

*Replace the floorjack and raise the car just enough to clear it from the jack stands.

*Remove the jackstands and lower the car.

*Using a clean funnel, refill the crankcase with 4.5 qts of 0W-20 of your choosing. 4.2qts if you did all of this with the exception of replacing the Engine Oil Filter.

*Do not overfill! Your best bet is to go the 4.2qts route, start it, run it and add as you deem appropriate.

*Ensure you replace your Engine Oil Dip Stick and the Engine Oil Filler Cap. Also, take one more minute and inspect your work area and ensure you have all of your shop materials accounted for and there isn't anything under the car or in the engine compartment that shouldn't be there.

*Did you turn your wheel to the right? Something to consider if you are working in a small garage. Make sure you straighten your steering wheel before you move the car.

*Once you have done so, consider yourself done.
 

Attachments

1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top