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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A Crosstour owning buddy related this to me:

His 2010 4WD CT with 4,000 miles was driving at highway speed, 65mph or so.

With no other warning, the rear wheels locked-up tight and the vehicle came to a relatively controlled, yet extremely abrupt stop. (as the front wheels seemed unaffected)

It was dragged onto a carrier and taken to a dealership. They kept it for 4 days and said it was fine, nothing wrong with it.

I really don't have any more details.

My buddy says that he has found only one other reported incidence of this.

Anyone else out there?
 

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I have over 16k miles on my CT, and havn't had that problem. Also, I'd get a different dealership to look at it if it did that and then they said nothing was wrong... Tell them to KEEP looking! That or get an attorney.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have over 16k miles on my CT, and havn't had that problem. Also, I'd get a different dealership to look at it if it did that and then they said nothing was wrong... Tell them to KEEP looking! That or get an attorney.
I also have 16,5k on my 2wd model and love it.

He is keeping all the paperwork and documentation so far, but as he's running for a local village trustee office, he's a bit distracted right now!
 

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Something similar happened to our 2003 chevy suburban. The rear locked up on the freeway, causing us to swurve off the road, and onto an grass bacnkment that almost flipped us over. This happened after my dad had picked us up from school almost 9 years ago when my jetta was in for service. He freaked out! After taking it to the dealer, they claimed it was fine because nothing had been reported to the computer. That was not acceptable! After a lawyer got involved, they had no choice but to take it back. It was apparantly due to a faulty ABS/ESC sensor that shorted out. Regardless, our family lawyer was abe to file a claim against the dealer for lack of care, and they were forced to take it back. There's more to this story, but chose to do the abridged version.

If I were you, ask them to check the stability control sensors. For some reason, ABS sensors like to short, especially in the rear wheels. This is, however, the first time I hear about it on the CT:(
 

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Man, that must have been scary. Never heard of anything like this on CT's.

You might want to follow up as iggibar sugested. Certainly unacceptable and they need to come up with a solution. If not, take 'em to court.
 

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what happened to the rear tires??? the bald spots should tell the dealer it really happened !:confused:
 

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Wow, good luck to your buddy, Doc. What a freaky to happen, out of the blue.
 

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used differentials
Electronic

Electronic limited slip differential systems use speed sensors, anti-lock braking system (ABS) sensors, accelerometers, and microcomputers to electronically monitor wheel slip and vehicle motion. In some systems the computer limits slip by varying the degree of locking in a mechanical LSD; such as Porsche's PSD system, which uses electro-hydraulic control of a mechanical LSD.

The Mitsubishi Active Yaw Control (AYC) electronically controlled rear differential uses a conventional open differential with an added planetary gear set to rotate two hollow shafts around the left hand drive shaft, one running at +15% speed, one at -15%. These can be progressively locked up to the left hand drive shaft via a hydraulic clutch pack under CPU control, increasing or decreasing the torque on that wheel in relation to the other. This allows a certain amount of rear wheel "steering" to provide stability control and perform the function of an LSD.

Many vehicles use a traction control system to simulate a limited slip differential. With this type of system, if either of the wheels on an axle is rotating unusually faster than the other, the computer will determine how much it is slipping and apply braking to it, slowing the spinning wheel down and thereby increasing torque to the wheel with more traction.
In 1932, Ferdinand Porsche designed a Grand Prix racing car for the Auto Union company. The high power of the design caused one of the rear wheels to experience excessive wheel spin at any speed up to 100 mph (160 km/h). In 1935, Porsche commissioned the engineering firm ZF to design a limited slip differential that would perform better.[citation needed] The ZF "sliding pins and cams" became available,[1] and one example was the Type B-70 for early VWs.
 

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I would be interested to know if the car had been exposed to deicing chemicals. In MT they use some awful stuff called magnesium chloride (it has salt in it) and it is famous for invading electrical connectors, sensors, wiring, etc. and causing all sorts of havoc on electronics under the car, among them intermittent short circuits.
 
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