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Discussion Starter #1
Last night we noticed a small puddle on our garage floor after backing up our crosstour. It was a dark blue, and feels like a lubricant or oil. I popped the hood and tried to find the source of the leak and found some on the front side of the engine housing... under the spark plugs (forgive me, but I am not very mechanically inclined) though it was hard to see where it was coming from exactly.
I've contacted our dealership and hope to find out what the problem is, but I was wondering if anyone else has experienced anything similar?
 

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Ouch, GWN......doesn't sound good:confused:. I don't know of any blue coloured liquids, tho I'm not up on the latest power steering fluid colour , brake fluid colour, or the oil in the A/C system.
G/L with repairs and make sure the oil and coolant are up b4 going anywhere.

C.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I looked at the usual liquids... brake fluid appears dark, steering fluid more of a golden color, transmission a red... so I'm not sure where this blue liquid came from. I'm going to try and take a closer look tonight... appointment with dealership is tomorrow so I'll keep you posted.
 

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You may want to try to collect some to take to the dealer.
Was there anything else on the floor that the fluid could have gotten its color from? Has any other vehicle been parked there recently? Just asking.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
At first I questioned the color as the garage floor may have something on it that made it change color. much like you stated. However the blue oily substance was also found on the engine housing (silver in color). Taking a sample isn't a bad idea, though I think the splashing found on the engine will likely be nicely baked on so I may not have to take a seperate sample. It is not a shared parking spot.
Thanks for the comments and questions.
 

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I wonder if you may have run over something that squirted onto the engine, and it just deposited some of it on the floor in your garage????
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I was wondering that too. But the splash or drippings on the engine itself are slightly infront of the front wheels, actually directly behind the grill, and very isolated, not all over the place like I'd expect with something being splashed up on to the engine. Even still, you may be right if it were say a bottle of something that squirted a bit into one spot on the engine. Hard to tell. Although there are plasitc covers under the engine that would block such splashing or squirting from hitting the engine (I think). I figured that with the additives they put in new cars that I couldn't be sure if it was from the engine or not. Better safe than sorry I guess. My first thought was, blue liquid - then it's either washer fluid or nothing at all. But it was oily so that made me wonder. I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask on this forum... you never know what you can learn from others.
 

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Yeah I was wondering that too. But the splash or drippings on the engine itself are slightly infront of the front wheels, actually directly behind the grill, and very isolated, not all over the place like I'd expect with something being splashed up on to the engine. Even still, you may be right if it were say a bottle of something that squirted a bit into one spot on the engine. Hard to tell. Although there are plasitc covers under the engine that would block such splashing or squirting from hitting the engine (I think). I figured that with the additives they put in new cars that I couldn't be sure if it was from the engine or not. Better safe than sorry I guess. My first thought was, blue liquid - then it's either washer fluid or nothing at all. But it was oily so that made me wonder. I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask on this forum... you never know what you can learn from others.
You may have also run over something (bottle of liquid or the like) that squirted up into that spot.
Something else to think about.
 

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The only blue liquids I've ever seen in cars is blue loctite, and you don't see that stuff until you start removing bolts where it's already dried up. But then again, those small handed guys at Honda may have found something crazy.

The other thing it could be is a blue walamrt shopping bag, I've seen it happen before, but not usually with a puddle
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well, I got the car back from the dealership and I'm told that it was the engine coolant that had leaked. Apparently the block heater gasket was not seated properly and it was leaking from there. I'm a little surprised that it was coolant as it felt pretty like oil to me. Though the service rep. stated that there tends to be additives put in some of the fluids in new cars. So I'm assuming that this is why the coolant resembled more of an oil... which might also explain why it was blue. They replaced the gasket and checked for leaks... none found. So all is well... hopefully this isn't the start of a trend.
 

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Wow, blue coolant! Only green up here in the north.

Nice to hear that you got to the bottom of the issue.

C.

Checked my coolant tonight. By dangy if it "ain't" blue. Who'd a thunk it?
 

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A block heater, what's that? lol

I would have NEVER thought about that, seeing as we have no use for them here.
 

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Block Heater

You got it two great tools Battery Blanket & Block Heater. Got both and love the summer time starts when the temps are in the 30 to 40 below zero range , love the sound "cracking" snow under these temps.
 

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Glad they found the problem and fixed it, now you have educated everyone on the mystery of the blue fluid.
 

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Honda Type II (Blue) Coolant

There is a lot of confusion "out there" on just what a blue coolant is, and the difference between all the colors. I found this on another forum dated in 2003. The contributor appears to have been an Acura Technician.

This comes from a old Acura Service News Article. I have seen more than a few premature waterpump failures on Acura vehicles that had been using aftermarket coolant.
Genuine Honda Coolant Is the Only Way to Go
Increasingly severe operating conditions and the
advent of lower maintenance requirements have
resulted in significant changes in the variety and the
concentration of additives used in engine coolant.
Also, the continual improvements in engine and
vehicle design have challenged coolant suppliers to
design products that perform well in a more
demanding environment.
To meet these needs, Honda engineers have
developed a superior, high-quality coolant that has
several advantages over the competition.
Some antifreeze, although labeled as safe for
aluminum parts, may not be compatible with Acura
cooling system components. Extensive research and
testing by both Honda R & D and CCI, the
manufacturer of the Honda coolant, have proven that
the abrasive silicates and/or borates found in most
domestic coolants can cause these problems:
• Silicates bond to the surface of the water pump seal
and act as an abrasive, causing considerable seal
erosion and coolant leakage. In actual tests, the
silicated coolant caused early leakage. This leakage
increased dramatically until a substantial portion of
the coolant had been lost. In contrast, the Honda
coolant had almost no leakage through the duration
of the test.
Coolant Leakage From Water Pump Seal
• Silicates tend to gel and settle in the coolest parts
of the cooling system, causing radiator plugging
and overheating.
• Borates cause pitting corrosion on the cylinder
head.
• Silicate inhibitors are difficult to stabilize and,
therefore, limit coolant shelf life.
Most commercially available coolants were
originally designed for cast iron engines. Silicate, an
inexpensive additive, was added to coolants to
prevent aluminum corrosion, but the long-term
durability of the combination was not tested.
In contrast, Honda coolant was designed
specifically for aluminum engines. It contains an
organic corrosion inhibitor instead of silicate. This
superior formula gives these advantages:
• No silicate abrasion of water pump seals. For
example, these graphs show the surface roughness
of two aluminum water pump seal rings. Seal A,
exposed to silicated coolant, shows considerable
damage. Seal B, exposed to Honda coolant,
displays only minute wear.
Seal A – Silicated Coolant
Seal B – Honda Coolant
• No plugging or overheating caused by silicate
gelling.
• Excellent corrosion protection for aluminum
components.
• Long-term corrosion protection for other cooling
system materials (steel, cast iron, copper, solder,
gaskets, seals, and O-rings).
You can find less expensive coolants on the
market, but now you can see why genuine Honda
coolant is the only coolant approved for Acura
vehicles (it must be used for warranty repairs).
Honda’s non-silicate formula delivers added
protection not offered by 95 percent of other brands.
Since our customers expect lower maintenance,
you’re doing them an injustice if you use any other
coolant.
 
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