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I've had similar problems with my 2010 Crosstour's brakes. I went with a pair of these rotors in the front

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001KO2J18/ref=oh_details_o09_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And these pads in the front as well.
http://www.amazon.com/Centric-Parts-105-10890-Disc-Brake/dp/B0019ILRYA

I also replaced the rear pads as they were extremely thin after only 39k miles

http://www.amazon.com/Centric-Parts-105-10860-PosiQuiet-Ceramic/dp/B005TW101C

These are high quality parts at a great price!
 

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All of us know about broblem with Crosstour OEM brake rotors.
What year is your Crosstour?

I know that there are issues with the brake pads on the 2010 Crosstour variant. If you go to an OEM parts site, the part number for the front brake pad on the 2010 is 45022-TP6-A00 while the front pad for the 2011-2013 is 45022-TP6-A60.

Rotors are seldom the cause of the judder issue. I've been racing cars since 1968 and I've never measured run-out on a rotor that's warped. I've seen plenty of cracked rotors but not warped.

The judder issue is an improper layering of the brake pad material onto the rotor. When I give the driver's meeting talk at the start of an instructional track day, I always tell my students to not use the parking brake after coming off of the track because the hot pad sitting against the hot rotor will unevenly transfer brake material to the rear rotor causing judder. They should park on the flat or across the slope and put the transmission into first gear or reverse to hold a car in place. Folks that only have paddle shifted automatic cars need to use small portable wheel chocks.

Had I had the opportunity to hear of your issue prior to your purchase, I would have first recommended having your rotors re-finished (lightly turned or sanded) and to replace the pads with an aftermarket alternative.

I have a model year 2012. The only brake issue that I have found is a little brake fade. Here are some authoritative references on judder and the issue of warping rotors that you my find worthwhile.

Car and Driver

Moss Motors

StopTech Brake Systems

From the Tire Rack site:
What is brake judder?
New brake pads need a smooth, clean surface to lay down an even transfer film. Residue from the previous pad compound on the surface or an uneven transfer film from overheating the new pads will cause the pads to grip-slip-grip-slip as they pass over the rotor surface under pressure. The resulting vibrations and noise telegraph and amplify as they pass through the suspension and steering components of the vehicle. This vibration and noise is known as brake judder or brake shimmy. This is often misdiagnosed as a warped rotor. If caught early enough, this can be fixed by cleaning the rotor surfaces with 200 grit garnet paper followed by spray brake cleaner to remove any compound buildup on the rotors. Then the pads should be re-bedded following the manufacturer’s instructions. Normally this will eliminate the judder and noise issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for you answer L8Apex!!! I learned much new!
But I think Crosstour OEM brakes system not suitable for so heavy car like CT, if you know the same rotors apply for CR-V but CT heavier and faster!!! When I have been in Europe and drove my CT in Germany about 100-120 mph I was very disappoint the brakes system of CT, but when I drove in city no problem with it!
I hope the new rotors will be cool down faster than OEM and problem with judder issue disappear!
 

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Our brakes are also the same as the honda odyssey as well :( Honda just doesn't put very good brakes on there cars. They always under power them.
 

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I've had ongoing front brake "Judder" problems with my 2003 Accord LX 4cyl. Dealer turned the rotors when the car was 6 months old and replaced the pads ((less than 10,000 miles on the car then). Did this several times with the symptoms reoccurring every 10,000-12,000 miles.

I went with some after market drilled and slotted rotors and the symptoms occurred less often, coming on slower as the miles wore on, but eventually the judder would become more than what I was willing to put up with.

A year and a half ago I changed a number of items on the car as it was approaching 10 years old and had over 100,000 miles on the odometer.

I upgraded the wheels and tires to 17x7.5 Helo HE845 Chrome wheels and installed 215/50R-17 Kumho Ecsta 4X XL on the new rims.

Installed new rotors and brake pads using Centric Posi Quiet Loaded Caliper Brake Pads with StopTech Cryo-SportStop Drilled Rotors. I also installed new front calipers, rebuilt the rear brakes (Drum style on the I4 LX) which had finally got down to minimum pad thickness after +100,000 miles and flushed the brake fluid. Drums needed a little turning to bring them back into spec, but where not bad at all considering their age and mileage.

After over a year and 25,000 miles (Brake pads are still good!) of making these improvements the brakes are still smooth as silk at any speed and grip really well. The added traction of the wider wheels and sticker/bigger tires have really improved the cars grip on the road and decreased road noise, (replacing the serpentine belt got rid of a lot of "road" noise also). The improved looks of the car with new wheels and a proper clean and polish job has made it a real keeper.

The more open design of the new wheels may be a contributing factor in the decrease of rotor warping as they should be keeping the brakes a lot cooler from what the old OEM steel wheel provided in air circulation.

My wife loves the Accord and does not want to give it up! That is how I got my new '13 Crosstour without much argument on who gets the "new" car!

These type of changes may be something to consider for those having "Judder" problems with their Crosstour...

Before and after of the Accord:




The brakes feel great on my 2013 Crosstour EX-L V6, but then I only have a little over 1,000 miles on it so far, hopefully the brakes Honda installs currently have improved since 2003...

 

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Hmm looking good, those are more powerful rotors... anyhow I like these wheels on the blue sedan... because they are looking more unique and more good. Thanks for sharing these photos. I like this thread.
 

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About 80% of your stopping load is on the front brake system. The front OEM rotors on the CT are fully vented. The OEM brake pads are not gaseous. So, cross drilling does very little, if anything, to handle the stopping load more efficiently. While the value of slotted rotors is very much in question, I just like them.

However, I do not use them on my track car. I use the OEM Honda rotor on the track with Hawk Blue brake pads. Works great. A lot of folks switched to drilled and slotted rotors for their S2000's after they bought one. I bought up their slightly used rotors for $15-20 per set. I've gone through 6 sets, have one on the car and 3 in reserve.

I'll stick with the OEM rotors on the CT, too.
 

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Any example?
Many people use this rotors and don't have any problem with it.
I doubt you will have problems with them. I just don't think they will make any noticeable difference compared to stock. Those types of rotors are more for appearance than anything imo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
About 80% of your stopping load is on the front brake system. The front OEM rotors on the CT are fully vented. The OEM brake pads are not gaseous. So, cross drilling does very little, if anything, to handle the stopping load more efficiently. While the value of slotted rotors is very much in question, I just like them.

However, I do not use them on my track car. I use the OEM Honda rotor on the track with Hawk Blue brake pads. Works great. A lot of folks switched to drilled and slotted rotors for their S2000's after they bought one. I bought up their slightly used rotors for $15-20 per set. I've gone through 6 sets, have one on the car and 3 in reserve.

I'll stick with the OEM rotors on the CT, too.
This is your choose, but for me OEM rotors only for city, if I'll not achieve a success with it, I'll try something different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I doubt you will have problems with them. I just don't think they will make any noticeable difference compared to stock. Those types of rotors are more for appearance than anything imo.
I did not say that rotors will brake better then stock, I just said the rotors will brake with out judder, and I know many people who solved the problem with R1 Concepts rotors.
 
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