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Me too, but without tint.
 

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I can't wait until we get some snow and ice to really see how it performs. I think the lowest point on the car is about 6.5 inches from the ground, and the differentials are around 8 inches. That can be some pretty tall snow
 

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I can't wait until we get some snow and ice to really see how it performs. I think the lowest point on the car is about 6.5 inches from the ground, and the differentials are around 8 inches. That can be some pretty tall snow
I've been consistently impressed with how little I need to shovel out infront of my car.

During storms the snow gets pushed up across the front of my parking space, and it's not unusual to have it come up to the "H" emblem on the grill.

Put the car in 2nd, turn the Traction Control off, and power right up and through the snow!

LOVE IT!

:)
 

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I just wanted to comment on what Xaque said above about turning off your (VSA) Vehicle Stability Assist. Turning off your (VSA) will give you the ability to spin donuts in the parking lot. It will also cause the back of your car to fishtail and perhaps even slide sideways, some call this drifting. On the other hand; if someone pulls quickly in front of you on a snowy/icy road, and you quickly maneuver to avoid an accident, you will wish you had VSA on. Some arm chair hot-rodder’s, tend to turn off VSA in the summer and leave it on during the winter. This allows you to do some mild summer wheel spins and obtain better cornering feel, but you could still have a need for VSA driving over unexpected puddles, dirt, and road gravel that could cause you an accident. The NHTSA states that 10,000 accidents a year can be prvented by VSA.

Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) is standard on all Crosstour models. During an oversteer or understeer condition, it can brake individual wheels and/or reduce engine power to help restore your intended course.

The vehicle stability assist (VSA) system helps to stabilize the vehicle during cornering if the vehicle turns more or less than desired. It also assists you in maintaining traction while accelerating on loose or slippery road surfaces. It does this by regulating the engine’s output and by selectively applying the brakes. When VSA activates, you may notice that the engine does not respond to the accelerator in the same way it does at other times. There may also be some noise from the VSA hydraulic system. You will also see the VSA system indicator blink.

If the low tire pressure indicator or TPMS indicator comes on, the VSA system automatically turns on even if the VSA system is turned off.

When VSA is off, the VSA OFF indicator comes on as a reminder.
When VSA activates, you will see the VSA system indicator blink.
 

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but pulling a few donuts is just so much fun !
 

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I just wanted to comment on what Xaque said above about turning off your (VSA) Vehicle Stability Assist. Turning off your (VSA) will give you the ability to spin donuts in the parking lot. It will also cause the back of your car to fishtail and perhaps even slide sideways, some call this drifting. On the other hand; if someone pulls quickly in front of you on a snowy/icy road, and you quickly maneuver to avoid an accident, you will wish you had VSA on. Some arm chair hot-rodder’s, tend to turn off VSA in the summer and leave it on during the winter. This allows you to do some mild summer wheel spins and obtain better cornering feel, but you could still have a need for VSA driving over unexpected puddles, dirt, and road gravel that could cause you an accident. The NHTSA states that 10,000 accidents a year can be prvented by VSA.

Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) is standard on all Crosstour models. During an oversteer or understeer condition, it can brake individual wheels and/or reduce engine power to help restore your intended course.

The vehicle stability assist (VSA) system helps to stabilize the vehicle during cornering if the vehicle turns more or less than desired. It also assists you in maintaining traction while accelerating on loose or slippery road surfaces. It does this by regulating the engine’s output and by selectively applying the brakes. When VSA activates, you may notice that the engine does not respond to the accelerator in the same way it does at other times. There may also be some noise from the VSA hydraulic system. You will also see the VSA system indicator blink.

If the low tire pressure indicator or TPMS indicator comes on, the VSA system automatically turns on even if the VSA system is turned off.

When VSA is off, the VSA OFF indicator comes on as a reminder.
When VSA activates, you will see the VSA system indicator blink.
You are absolutely right about everything! Perhaps I wasn't clear about what I meant:

When I mentioned putting the car in 2nd gear and turning off VSA, it was for the purpose of getting through the snowbank.

If you are trying to get "unstuck" from snow, and the VSA is on, the vehicle may automatically limit power to select wheels or apply breaks because it believes you are in a slide or similar even though it is just some wheel spin while trying to break free.

Once you get your vehicle unstuck / through the snow blocking in the parking spot, put the vehicle back into "D" and turn VSA back on.
 

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And for you kids, don't try this at home, and stay in school.
 
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