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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m a big believer of using a magnetic oil drain plug. Oil is like the blood of the engine, and I always use top of the line oil and filters. I don’t want any harmful pieces of metal floating around to cause trouble. Oil filters do not catch everything. Once you start using a magnetic oil drain plug, you will see with each oil change the amount of metal it catches. I don’t want that metal in my synthetic oil wearing down critical parts. I find that changing your oil drain plug about the simplest and least costly thing someone can do for their engine (About $10). Pictures below of the stock oil drain plug and the Gold Magnetic oil drain plug. You can purchase a colored drain plug on Ebay if you really want to color coordinate your under-carriage. See attached picture.

Even though I only have about 1700 miles on my CT, while I had it up on the lift painting the wheels (See ‘How to Paint Your Wheels’) in the prior thread, I decided to change the oil drain plug. It was not yet time to change the oil, so while the engine was COLD, I loosened the drain plug and pulled it out quickly (dripping perhaps 1 or 2 tablespoons of oil). I just put my thumb against the drain hole. You can use rubber gloves if you don’t want to get your hands dirty. In one swoop motion, I put in the new magnetic oil drain plug. Make sure to check and top off your oil (0w20) when done. I checked my oil afterwards and it was still exactly at the full mark.

I also like to take a Sharpie Black Marker and write on the oil pan the size of the wrench needed to remove the drain plug. This is not just for my benefit, but should I be in a place where I can’t change the oil and must take it to a quick change place, I would rather they see what tool to use instead of them trying to use vice grips or pliers and messing up my drain plug.

NOTE: Always use a new crush washer when replacing your drain plug and torque to the proper tightness.

Obviously, during an oil change is the best time to change your drain plug. If you don’t intend to change your own oil, just give your new magnetic oil drain plug to your dealership service advisor or the technician at the quickly lube; either will be happy to install it during their normal oil change service.
 

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Ordered one on e-bay today. $9.99 w/free shipping.
Thanks for the reminder, and the great post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is there a certain size that we should pick or are all the drain plugs the same size?
what size is the magnetic drain plug?
Gibnigtmus

Good question! A question I pondered when I wanted magnetic drain plugs for my CT. If you go to Advance Auto, O’Reilly’s, Car Quest, NAPA they will usually have an assortment of magnetic drain plugs to choose from making you know the exact thread and size of the plug you want. Like you, I was not sure of what size to get. I looked around the Internet and decided to go with the Gold Plug. They have an application guide on their site, and when I was not able to find one for the CT differential, their customer service quickly helped me determine the correct size. By-the-way, they were right on. I find their magnet plugs a bit higher quality than others. Some cheaper plugs you can actually pull the magnet out of the plug, or some plugs use cheap magnets that have little strength. So, to try and answer your question, do what I did. Check with Gold Plug. www.magneticdrainplug.com I ordered enough to cover ALL the drain plugs on my vehicle. I believe their price is $9.99 per plug. I received mine in about 5 – 7 days after ordering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not trying to be difficult, but I ordered this from a friends computer and don’t have that computer around anymore, so I can’t say specifically what part number it was. In going to their site, click on the box at the top: PLUG SEARCH, and then CLICK HERE TO SEARCH FOR AUTOMOTIVE MAGNETIC DRAIN PLUGS. You can then enter 2012 Honda Crosstour with a 3.5 liter engine and it will give you the below part numbers:

Oil Drain Plug MP-02
Rear Differential AP-07
Automatic Transmission AP-07
Transfer Case AP-07

Please double check my numbers, but this sounds correct from what I remember. I remember asking for all 4 plugs and 3 were the same part number. I have already installed three of the above four plugs in my CT. I’ll do the automatic transmission change when I get a few more miles and then install the magnetic plug then. Hope this helps.
 

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Six of one, half dozen of the other. . .but personally I toss my oil pan bolt whenever I do an oil change per manufacturer recommendation (it's actually even in the owner's manual which I thought was impressive). I think almost all manufacturers recommend this due to the comparatively thinner/weaker sheet metal of the oil pan and it's easily mangled threads, the relative softness of the washer, and the high tensile strength of the alloy bolt (this is going half on memory, half on speculation, I'm sure Crash can correct anything I've misstated). If you are this anal like myself though, you're probably using a torque wrench to tighten down these bolts too. . .

So I was thinking if you wanted to continue to put a fresh bolt in to preserve the threads in your drain holes, and also get benefits of magnetic particle capture, you could just stick an extremely strong magnet on the outside of the various drain pans, cases, and remove it at time of fluid draining to allow particles to escape.

I've used this place on the web for their pretty good deals on high end magnets for all sorts of projects, they have rubberized magnets as well (and also in colors to maybe help keep them visible underneath your car). I love that site because they list a wonderfully nerdy amount of technical specs for each magnet. Standard disclaimers, no affiliation. . .yadda yadda. . .

However, one could also make the case that if you have metal particulate serious enough and large enough to get trapped by a magnet in your oil pan, that the damage has already been done. I say this looking back at the slushbox on my 2001 BMW 325ci that just fried one day (exact diagnosis unknown, but a not uncommon failure, BMW paid for $5k in parts 8 years after warranty expired, I had to pay for labor), that was a catastrophic failure that no magnet could have prevented.
 
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