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I have had my CT EX-L no Nav for about a month now. Love it. A little disappointed in the gas mileage compared to my 2004 Accord though. I purchased the CT instead of another Accord basically because of the ridiculous winters we've been having in Chicago lately. My only complaint with my Accords (and I have owned many) was their handling on snowy and slippery roads. My wife has been driving Subaru Outbacks for the last 10 years and her Outback is amazing in the snow. Does anyone have any experience with their AWD Crosstours in snowy and slippery conditions. Does the AWD perform as well as it is touted? Looking forward to your responses.
 

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I have no experience with AWD CT or AWD anything. But I lived thru the blizzard of '78 and '84 (?)in Chicago with FWD SAABs. And 25" snows in Indiana. First, it's crazy to drive when there is a foot or more. Yes, SUVs have th eclearnace for that and the CT has more than your average car.
But I passed all kinds of 4D and AWD SUVs and PUs that were in the mdeian crashed while I went safely by.

Snow tires on all four wheels is the answer. If you get wheels and snows when the car is new the tires are basically free ( you aren't using the summer ones when using the snows) and all you pay for is wheels. Or you can mount and dismount and balance twice a year but that is actually more expensive than just getting an extra set of wheels.

Consider "minus 1" size or even "minus 2". Places like Tire Rack or Discount Tire can help. Narrower tires are better in snow, they concentrate the traction in smaller patch and also "plow" less snow in front of them, especially when turning. And modern high quality snows stay flexible at low temps and also actually can grip ice like studes with the compounds they put in the rubber.

In Indiana I had a 40 mile commute, over half on winding and hilly roads. During snowstorms I could safely go 10-20 MPH faster than the other cars, when they weren't in my way:rolleyes:


I now live in Tucson, AZ, virtually no snow, but torrential rains. Good all season tires that resist hydroplaning are the norm.
 

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Yes, the AWD works as well as expected. I bought my Ct back in late Fall and never got around to putting snow tires on and I got through an Ontario Winter with no issues. Don't get me wrong, I still think winter tires are a must because AWD doesn't do much in way of traction under braking. We have the same AWD set up on my wife's Element and I thought it was so great that I wouldn't have bought the CT without it.

As or the gas mileage I feel your pain but it does get better. For the longest time I would get barely 500km of highway driving per tank (about 310miles) and at 75 $ to fill the tank it got expensive really fast. At roughly 35000kms I finaly started seeing a real improvement and I now get between 600 and 650kms per tank (372 to 403miles) which is pretty much what I expected I should get in the beginning
 

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The AWD system in the Honda isn't the same variety as the Subaru, and I'm willing to guess that the Honda system will feel inferior to the Subaru.

The Subaru systems is on all the time. Constantly changing the power ratio between wheels.

Whereas the Crosstour is primarily FWD, and only applies power (through a wet clutch) to the rear wheels when the front ones start to spin.

The Honda system wont make the Crosstour a Rally car by any stretch... but it's good for getting out of snow packed spaces, through ruts, and off the line on slippery roads.

The greatest improvement will come, as stated, by using snow tires (studded is great).

That said, I had my Crosstour in our nasty New England winter last season, and I was very happy with it. I never got stuck anywhere and was otherwise impressed by the way the car handled the snow.
 

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Actually, I don't recommend studs. I had them before they were banned in Illinois about 30 years ago. Yes, they were good on glare ice but terrible on dry pavement. Noisy and poor dry traction. Let's face it, especially in snowy urban areas the idea is to get thru the first day of the snowfall, after that there's more wet road than snow. The new high tech snows are almost as good on ice and much better on wet and dry. My opinion, anyway.
 

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The CT is not available in AWD. It only comes in FWD and 4WD.
It's semantics and not every car manufacturer (or individual) agrees on what the wording means.

Some people consider the CT an AWD vehicle because the driver can not select when to engage the system... the car does when traction is lost.

Some people only consider 4WD to mean a vehicle that is capable of being locked into 4WD by the driver.

Either way, it just goes to show that each of us needs to be certain what a car manufacturer means when they use potentially vague terms.

:)
 

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Marketing people certainly have made a mess of 4WD and AWD among other things! My 4WD CT slogged though MD and PA snow last winter w/o complaint on the stock tires. That's good enough for me. I don't plan on taking it up 20% grades in 2+ ft. of snow 8)
 

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i cant wait to see how it performs in snow!
 

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Years ago my old first gen CRV with realtime 4wd did fine in snow on all seasons. Comparable to awd Imprezas I had in the past also on all seasons. I expect the Crosstour with the extra weight to do even better. If you can swing it buy a dedicated set of snow tires on separate wheels. All seasons = no seasons.
 

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So if I took off the traction control in the snow, would only the front 2 tires spin?
Negative.

The differential that causes the rear tires to spin is a straight up fluid thing. No computer involved. Just the act of the front tires spinning in relation to engine speed causes the rear wheels to be engaged.

At least this is how I understand the system to work.
 

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whofreak2, I think you'll be really happy with the Crosstour AWD's winter performance.

Trust me, I know winter driving. I live in a semi-rural area of Alaska and have been driving a 2010 CT through one of the most extreme winters I've seen in a while. We've had snow 6 to 12 inches at a time and temperatures in the negative 20s. I purchased my CT in November and it's performed every bit as well as my previous 2005 Cr-V (128,000 miles), 2001 Ford Escape (104,000 miles), and my 1996 Toyota RAV-4 (100,000 miles).

The only thing you need to be a little more careful with the CT than with the Cr-V and similar vehicles is high centering at very low speeds in really deep, slushy snow. While ground clearance is similar to the Cr-V, the approach angle, length and aerodynamic effects under the CT make it a little more prone to ride up on snow.

I can make a good argument both for and against studded tires. I've mostly driven studs on the above vehicles, but have opted to drive the last two winters on stock all-season tires on my Cr-V and, this winter, my CT.

Here are my thoughts: If you live where you frequently have slippery, icy roads, studs absolutely can not be beat. Period. You will stop quicker and corner better. However, if you live in a colder state where the roads are frequently dry or it's cold enough that the snow/ice on the roads is dry and relatively sticky, you are better off without them. Studs minimize your contact with dry pavement, and that is not a good thing. As someone else pointed out, they are also much noisier on dry pavement.

Also as others have pointed out, don't be confused by the terminology: Honda's AWD system (labeled as 4WD on the CT) is not the same as a lockable 4WD system you would find on something like a truck. But AWD is all you'll need to keep you in business on the road.
 
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